KLRC Live Stream

Now Playing:

Support KLRCMake a Donation »

The KLRC Blog

Several years ago, a government official was invited to be the commencement speaker for a small college in South Carolina.

The auditorium was filled with students excited about the opportunity to hear a person of her stature speak. After the governor gave the introduction, the speaker began by saying, “I was born to a mother who was deaf and could not speak. I do not know who my father is or was. The first job I ever had was in a cotton field. But nothing has to remain the way it is if that’s not the way a person wants it to be."

I'm Joe Butler, founder of Ability Tree, and parent of a child with autism. April is Autism Awareness Month. You've heard about autism, but what is it exactly?

According to the Autism Society, Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental disability; signs typically appear during early childhood and affect a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. ASD is defined by a certain set of behaviors and is a “spectrum condition” that affects individuals differently and to varying degrees. Autism affects 1 in 68 children.

In regard to racial reconciliation, people often ask me, “James, what are we supposed to do?”

For reconciliation to begin, the first and most important step is to listen and empathize with another person’s experience that is different than yours. If we cannot connect with each other’s experiences, then we cannot be a part of each other’s healing.

If I were a silent voice inside your head helping you to build healthy relationships you might hear me ask, “Are you speaking from the heart?” 

Let me use a metaphor to explain why I posed such an important question. Memorizing scripture can be a powerful part of our spiritual journey, or it can just be rote memorization. If it’s the latter, the words mean nothing; it's only an exercise in brain power.

I love the idea of a simpler life. A life that is less crowded, less complicated. I'm inspired by people who take it seriously, and likewise I'm discouraged when my own life feels the curse of what Richard Foster rightly calls, "muchness and manyness." 

Simplifying, pairing things down in responsibilities that we carry, can really be a good thing in life. It can also be good for the health of our souls. Is it possible that even in my own pursuit of God I can be held back by muchness and manyness? Jesus had strong words for this kind of person. A pharisee, who loved to be seen and heard for their religiosity. 

The people in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, had a great idea back in 1962. They assembled a time capsule to preserve the town’s history for future generations. Then they buried it. The problem was, when they wanted to dig it up 25 years later for a city celebration, no one could recall where it was.

During this time of year, we are often reminded of 2 categories of change: the things we need to stop, and the things we need to start.

This is no surprise, because when we are facing pain our discomfort in in everyday life, these are the two paths that present themselves the most.

Cortez and his men sailed from Spain and landed on the coast of Mexico in 1519. Initially the crew was awed by the beautiful land, but after months of hard work and little to show for it, their excitement turned to restlessness and revolt.

They wanted to abandon this New World and return home to their old one. Murmurings of mutiny were on everyone’s lips. Captain Cortez knew from the high level of discontent that the men would soon break ranks and leave. They would only work to tame the New World if it was their only hope of survival.

If I were a silent voice inside your head right now helping you to build healthy relationships, you might hear me say, “Generally speaking, what is said is never what is heard.”

More times than not, we assume the worst, and then we start acting out what we think we heard. It’s like we instantly become mind-readers or something. And then we’re mad at our spouse, a friend, or a colleague, and they might not even know anything is wrong! Why? Because no one stopped to clarify, or even ask the question, “Did you mean that? Because I heard this.”

We've been pondering the unimaginable love of God, and how we can pray for such love in the lives around us. Paul is teaching us in Ephesians 3, praying that his friends would be rooted and established in love, and that they would come to know how wide the love of Christ is.

Our Tweets
Your Tweets
Have you ever felt like God is distant? It’s hard to admit, but I do sometimes. The confusion, the frustration, the… https://t.co/1KNJOW6dMH
Your day was covered in God's grace before it began. Don't let the world get you down! Live in the victory Christ h… https://t.co/CKy4WpCoRo