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Successful companies, churches, sports teams, and marriages have more good than bad happening, but they get better because they are willing to address the issues that are not quite right. Yes, 98% of things may be going well, but that 2% needs to be addressed or it could jeopardize the other 98%.

The percentages I used are hypothetical, but I want to make a point. If you love something – a relationship, a person, your community, your country, or your local church – then you must deal with the areas of tension to find healing and deeper connection.

I'm Holley Gerth, author of You're Already Amazing. If we could have coffee today, I'd say, only God can tell us who we really are. 

Tell me who I am. Isn't this request the whisper of our hearts? We look for the answer in friendships, in romance, in jobs. Surely all of these will tell us if we're okay. If we're worthy. If we're enough. Isn't that how it works?

If I were a silent voice inside your head helping you to build healthy relationships, you might hear me whispering in your ear something you’ve heard all your life: it’s "The Golden Rule."

That’s right, it comes straight out of scripture from Matthew 7:12, "Therefore however you want people to treat you, so treat them, for this is the Law and the Prophets." The Golden Rule rolls off the tongue like water off a duck's back. It has long been known as "The Standard" for how to treat others the way God intended, resulting in lasting healthy relationships.

Several years ago, a government official was invited to be the commencement speaker for a small college in South Carolina.

The auditorium was filled with students excited about the opportunity to hear a person of her stature speak. After the governor gave the introduction, the speaker began by saying, “I was born to a mother who was deaf and could not speak. I do not know who my father is or was. The first job I ever had was in a cotton field. But nothing has to remain the way it is if that’s not the way a person wants it to be."

I'm Joe Butler, founder of Ability Tree, and parent of a child with autism. April is Autism Awareness Month. You've heard about autism, but what is it exactly?

According to the Autism Society, Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental disability; signs typically appear during early childhood and affect a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. ASD is defined by a certain set of behaviors and is a “spectrum condition” that affects individuals differently and to varying degrees. Autism affects 1 in 68 children.

In regard to racial reconciliation, people often ask me, “James, what are we supposed to do?”

For reconciliation to begin, the first and most important step is to listen and empathize with another person’s experience that is different than yours. If we cannot connect with each other’s experiences, then we cannot be a part of each other’s healing.

If I were a silent voice inside your head helping you to build healthy relationships you might hear me ask, “Are you speaking from the heart?” 

Let me use a metaphor to explain why I posed such an important question. Memorizing scripture can be a powerful part of our spiritual journey, or it can just be rote memorization. If it’s the latter, the words mean nothing; it's only an exercise in brain power.

I love the idea of a simpler life. A life that is less crowded, less complicated. I'm inspired by people who take it seriously, and likewise I'm discouraged when my own life feels the curse of what Richard Foster rightly calls, "muchness and manyness." 

Simplifying, pairing things down in responsibilities that we carry, can really be a good thing in life. It can also be good for the health of our souls. Is it possible that even in my own pursuit of God I can be held back by muchness and manyness? Jesus had strong words for this kind of person. A pharisee, who loved to be seen and heard for their religiosity. 

The people in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, had a great idea back in 1962. They assembled a time capsule to preserve the town’s history for future generations. Then they buried it. The problem was, when they wanted to dig it up 25 years later for a city celebration, no one could recall where it was.

During this time of year, we are often reminded of 2 categories of change: the things we need to stop, and the things we need to start.

This is no surprise, because when we are facing pain our discomfort in in everyday life, these are the two paths that present themselves the most.

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